Be on the Lookout for Valuable Gold Alloys

We’ve already written posts about gold alloys that result in colored gold.

But let’s review . . .

 Image Credit: Metallos [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Image Credit: Metallos [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

  • Yellow gold can be either pure 24k gold, or gold that is alloyed with very small percentages of silver, copper or zinc
  • Red gold, which is usually 18k, is an alloy of gold and copper
  • Rose and pink gold, also usually 18k, are alloys of gold and copper, silver, or both
  • White gold, also usually 18k, is an alloy of gold and palladium, platinum, nickel, or zinc
  • Green gold, also usually 18k, is an alloy of gold and silver, cadmium, or both
  • Blue gold, also usually 18k, is an alloy of gold and iron
  • Purple gold, which we have rarely seen and which comes in different karat ratings, is an alloy of gold and aluminum

Gold Alloys that Are Not Used in Jewelry

Those alloys are almost always used to make gold jewelry. But in case you think gold alloys are only used to make jewelry, think again. Gold alloys can be found in other places too, like these . . .

  • Dental appliances. Alloys of palladium and gold have been used in the past to make various dental appliances like bars and bridges; the palladium serves to harden the gold and make it more durable.
  • Automotive and industrial applications. Would you believe that alloys of gold and palladium were once commonly used in electrodes on spark plugs before platinum replaced them? Those plugs are rare today . . . but you never know what you might find in the back of an old garage or car repair facility. Alloys of gold and palladium were also used in a variety of industrial and manufacturing applications until about 60 years ago. Are they rare? Yes, but if you keep your eyes open, you might find a profitable surprise.
  • Jewelry making supplies. Gold jewelry soldering supplies often contain gold, silver, and copper. If you’re liquidating an old jewelry factory, be on the lookout for soldering wires, which can be worth more than you’d expect.
  • Electrical applications. Alloys of copper and gold and silver and gold have been used in years past to make contacts and other components for a variety of electronic devices, especially for medical applications. So if you find yourself looking at a scrapped old x-ray machine, it could profit you to pull it apart, investigate further, extract any shiny contacts and components and send them to us for testing.

And When You Call . . .

Be sure to mention our blog and ask whether the items you’re sending to us for testing qualify for discounted or free shipping. Call our recycling and refining experts today at 800-426-2344 to learn more.

Related Posts:

Is White Gold Worth More than Other Gold 
Selling Your Gold: What’s the Difference Between an Appraiser and an Assayer? 
Recycling Gold: Do Older or Newer Sources Give You the Greater Yield? 
Can You Accurately Test Gold at Home?